Wally Olson Marketing Schools

Posted February 8th, 2019 — Filed in Marketing

Wally has the following Marketing school scheduled:

  • November 12-15, 2019 in Claremore, OK; click here for the information/registration form.

Read more about Wally and his school on his website here: olsonranchllc.com

It Makes a Difference for that One

Posted January 27th, 2019 — Filed in Stockmanship

[Note from Tina—]

As you know, Mom and I kicked “writing the book” into high gear at the beginning of January. We’ve been building time-lines, collecting resources, writing schedules, and recording stories. One of the resources we had was a big envelope of letters Mom had written to our good friends Rich and Carolyn Hunt in Northern California between 1978 and 2005. Carolyn saved those letters and returned them to Mom for the express purpose of using them for the book! I finished typing them in last week, and they were full of great stories on their own as well as insights into other stories Mom will flesh out.

One item I found interesting, and a little sad, was this part from a letter Mom write September 5, 1989 when Dad was just breaking out of his first “retirement” and really getting into teaching large numbers of people. Mom write:

“One of the things they are having trouble with is the cattle don’t settle down and enjoy their new paddock. They either walk the fences or go over them. They don’t pick up their calves when they move the cattle to a new paddock, so they have to leave the gates open between several paddocks which pretty well negates the whole idea. I guess the coyotes have gotten smart to the fact that when they move the cows out, the calves are easy pickin’s.”

The sad part is, we hear these exact words from attendees of our schools today even though Dad’s teachings (which reached an astounding number of ranchers for thirty years) showed exactly how to stop each of these challenging situations.

Richard and I were talking today about how, sometimes, it does get depressing to think that maybe we are fighting a losing battle. Maybe no one is listening as we carefully try and explain how to “get their minds right” and various other keys to Proper Stockmanship (that Dad also carefully explained in his many schools).

But then we were reminded of the call we got a few days ago from a student who had received a new load of calves, and one wasn’t eating yet. We talked with him about proper driving and working with them all, and yesterday he messaged us a shot of all the calves peacefully eating at the bunk!

This reminded us of the story of the Starfish Thrower. I googled a little to try and get the proper wording and found the story has actually been told and re-told in many different ways from the original book described here. However, I liked the version below I found on this web page.

A young girl was walking along a beach upon which thousands of starfish had been washed up during a terrible storm. When she came to each starfish, she would pick it up, and throw it back into the ocean. People watched her with amusement.

She had been doing this for some time when a man approached her and said, “Little girl, why are you doing this? Look at this beach! You can’t save all these starfish. You can’t begin to make a difference!”

The girl seemed crushed, suddenly deflated. But after a few moments, she bent down, picked up another starfish, and hurled it as far as she could into the ocean. Then she looked up at the man and replied, “Well, I made a difference to that one!”

The old man looked at the girl inquisitively and thought about what she had done and said. Inspired, he joined the little girl in throwing starfish back into the sea. Soon others joined, and all the starfish were saved.

— Adapted from ‘The Star Thrower’ by Loren C. Eiseley

I think this message fits in well as we come up to the 2019 Bud Summit, a gathering of “Budders,” subscribers to the stockmanship.com/subscription website, sharing the word about Bud Williams Proper Stockmanship (and Livestock Marketing).

Maybe, just maybe, there will come a day when every rancher will be able to drive his pairs to new paddocks and have them put their heads down and graze quietly. Until then, those of us teaching and sharing Dad’s methods will continue to throw the starfish and “make a difference to that one!”

Stockmanship Schools Coming up!

Posted January 17th, 2019 — Filed in Calendar, Stockmanship

Whit Hibbard and Dawn Hnatow will be putting on two Low-Stress Livestock Handling Clinics near Sulphur Springs, TX.

The Introductory session will be March 1-2, and the Intermediate session will be March 8-9. Note the date changes.

Contact John Haskell at 435.881.2871 for more information or to register.

Help Wanted

Posted December 28th, 2018 — Filed in Miscellaneous

Northwest OK starter yard looking for experienced pen rider. Looking for someone experienced in or willing to learn LSH. Pay based on experience. Benefits available.

Contact Kent Miller  580-571-5763

3M & H Land and Cattle, LLC
178587 E CR 44
Gage, OK 73843

Time to Write the Book!

Posted October 6th, 2018 — Filed in Calendar, Marketing, Stockmanship

[Note from Tina] Mom, Richard, and I have been talking about writing the book about Mom and Dad’s life for a long time now. Finally, we realized that, if we don’t start on it and really put some focus into it, it just won’t happen. Therefore, we have decided to not teach ANY Hand ‘n Hand Livestock Solutions schools in 2019 (except the 3 day Marketing and Stockmanship School in February just before the 2019 Bud Summit) so we can focus on collecting the information and writing the book.

So, if you have been putting off attending a school thinking, “I’ll just get the next one,” you might consider attending this school in Springfield, or you will need to wait until our next school before the 2020 Bud Summit.

Watch for notice that the book is ready to order!

The Bud & Eunice Williams Book

Cow’s Mothering Rating

Posted July 28th, 2018 — Filed in Stockmanship

I have been following a thread on another e-mail list comparing the mothering rating of the cow that tries to attack anyone who gets close to their new-born calf as opposed to the cow that is OK with this. The consensus seems to be that the mellow cow is not as good mother as the cow that will try to eat you. I disagree with this.

Bud and I found that when you work livestock properly – that is, by using pressure/release methods instead of force and fear, the cows learn to respect but not fear you.  Since they don’t feel you are a threat to them, they also don’t think you are a threat to their calf so they don’t “get on the fight” when you need to handle their new baby.

When we lived in Canada we were involved with a Beef Booster cow herd.  In case you aren’t familiar, this is a composite breed.  Some of the herds were rated “Maternal.” Their main function was to produce heifers to go into the cow herd, another raised “Terminal bulls” to use on the herds that would market all of their calves, etc.  The man we worked for had about 100 head of cows that were designed to raise “Terminal bulls.”  He wanted to change over to a “Maternal” herd so he swapped his herd with a neighbor.  When these cows were delivered the neighbor also delivered a list of ear-tag numbers of cows that would kill you if you tried to handle their baby calf.   The only way they could weigh and tag the calf was with a bucket loader on a tractor.  A man in the bucket would get the calf, then the tractor operator would try to raise the bucket before the cow could climb in, too.  We received these cows in October.  We handled them quite a lot.  If the feedlot shipped a pen of cattle and there was still feed in the bunks, we’d put these cows in the pen for a while to let them clean the bunk.  Through the winter we tried to move their straw bed every few days to make it easier when they farmed the ground in the spring.  This usually meant we had to drive the cows to the new bed a couple of times to discourage them from going back to the old one, etc.  When spring came the owner was able to weigh and tag every calf with no aggression from any of the cows.

The first year we worked on the elk ranch In Texas, we didn’t see an elk calf until it was a couple of weeks old.  The following year, the cow elk would bring their newborn calves with them when we drove through the pasture, scattering hay.  We even had one calf born in the corral.

Bud Tee-Shirt

Posted July 6th, 2018 — Filed in Miscellaneous, Stockmanship

An email from Steve Cote—I was going through some boxes this week and came across a forgotten old T shirt from 1996 or 7. It has never been worn because it was a special one because of the story behind it.

When I was working with the Morgan Creek Grazing Association in Challis, ID, we had gone to schools and one day I was riding on the allotment with Lloyd Bradshaw and Tim Westfall. We were looking out over cattle scattered over thousands of acres. While we knew we had to get them working, we knew we had to get them put together and handling well like he said but in reality, none of knew just where to start. After we talked about it enough Lloyd finally said, “Let’s put a little Bud on em” and off we rode.

After that whenever were rode to new bunches, that was the game plan “put a little Bud on ‘em”. Things went phenomenally well that year, we won many awards, and the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District decided to get everyone involved in the project a Bud Williams T shirt. They took a picture of us moving stock on the allotment with a logo across it. The printer got the saying partly wrong but the idea was right.

We Do Not Endorse the BudFlow Tub System

Posted May 27th, 2018 — Filed in Miscellaneous, Stockmanship

I know Bud’s name means something in livestock circles so just to set the record straight, Bud Williams Stockmanship does NOT endorse the BudFlow tub system.

Canadian Job Opportunity

Posted March 1st, 2018 — Filed in Miscellaneous, Stockmanship

Hello Eunice, I haven’t talked with you in quite awhile.  My name is Kevin Cherpin.  I have worked at learning proper stockmanship for years.  I was introduced to it in college, and took the course from Richard and Tina about 3 winters ago.  I work on a community pasture in south west Saskatchewan.  It has been difficult to find riders for our summer riding positions, let alone one that wants to work toward proper stockmanship.  I was curious if you, Richard, or Tina would know of anyone that would be interested in a job like that in Canada?  This will be a federal position for this upcoming summer so they would need to be a Canadian resident. They wouldn’t need a lot of experience as long as they were keen and willing.  Thank you for your time.

Kevin Cherpin – SW Saskatchewan
1-306-296-7706    kevincherpin@gmail.com

Teaching a Dog to Guard the Gate

Posted February 14th, 2018 — Filed in Stockdogs

Question:   One thing that I wanted to quiz you on Bud told me he could teach a dog to watch an open gate in a day, I would like a few tips on this please.

Answer:   This is the way Bud inadvertently trained two different dogs to guard the gate.

In about 1960 we were working on a sheep ranch back in the hills in Northern California.  One day a timber cruiser stopped at the house looking for a line-marker.  Bud and he got to talking about dogs and we had a Border Collie pup Bud was pretty proud of.  Patsy was only about 8 months old but was already well on her way to being a very good dog.  The entrance to the sheep corrals was a narrow spot between two houses.  It was a very difficult place to put the sheep through.  There were about 50 sheep in sight so Bud sent Patsy to bring them in.  She had a little trouble getting them through the gate, but she really impressed our visitor and managed to do the job.  As soon as they went in the corral, Bud sent her to bring them out again.  He fooled around with her putting the sheep in and out of the corral while he talked to the timber cruiser.  A week or so later, we had to corral the sheep.  We had about 800 ewes with their lambs heading right for the gate when Patsy ran to the lead and turned them back.  After regrouping we got them going again and she did the same thing.  We finally had to put her on a leash in order for the other dogs to be able to corral the sheep.  By sending her too quickly to bring the sheep out of the corral when they went in, Bud accidently made her think he didn’t want them in the corral.

Fast forward to about 1970 . . . We had a young Border Collie that just didn’t have enough force for cattle so we gave him to a friend who ran sheep.  In about a week Tommy brought Moss back along with a trailer load of sheep and said “This is a great dog and I don’t want to ruin him.  Will you get him started on sheep for me?”  After a couple of weeks Bud could stand in one spot and direct Moss to put the sheep in any pen in the corral system.  He was hard-pressed to find anything to challenge him with so one day we opened the people door to the barn which led into the area where we kept the saddles and grain, etc.  It was pretty dark and full of stuff.  The sheep gave Moss a real work-out but he was able to put them all in.  Since we really didn’t want the sheep in there Bud quickly sent him around to bring them back out.  When he asked him to put them back in again, Moss would hold them right at the door, but would stop any that tried to enter the barn.  Remembering what caused Patsy’s problem Bud put a leash on Moss, helped him put the sheep in the barn, stopped for just a few seconds and said “Good boy” then sent him in to bring them back out.  All it took to make the correction was to let him know he was right to put the sheep in the barn…  Now, new project … we want you to bring them out of the barn.

People often think they want a really smart dog, but a dog that is a little slower is often a lot easier to handle.  If it takes 5 repetitions for a dog to “get it” chances you won’t make the same mistake 5 times in a row that is inadvertently teaching something you don’t want.

Sorry to be so long-winded, but I guess by now you can figure out how Bud would teach a dog to guard the gate.

Eunice

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