Bud Williams Stockmanship and Livestock Marketing

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Bud Williams Stockmanship
Eunice Williams
1519 E Erie St, Apt #206
Springfield, MO 65804
417-719-4910
eunice@stockmanship.com

Archives
Introduction to my Stockdog Methods

I was born on a farm in Oregon in 1932. My Dad’s insistence that us kids be “Good Neighbors” has led me through a very interesting life. I have worked on ranches or with livestock most of my life. I always had good dogs, so I had lots of practice

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My Two-cents Worth

To expand on Bud’s statement about placing livestock and have them stay where you want them to without the use of fences: The traditional way of driving livestock is to get behind them and force or frighten them to move away, hopefully in the direction you want them to go.

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How Bud Starts a Pup

When Bud starts a cow dog, the only thing he wants the pup’s mind on is the cattle. He is very careful not to distract it from the stock. Even if the pup had been schooled with obedience commands, he never uses them the first few times he takes it

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Feasibility

I have been asked to give my opinion about the feasibility of herding livestock in open range conditions. I have been involved in this type of livestock work for a good many years and consider it not only possible, but preferable, under many conditions, to using fences to control the

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How to Keep Your Dog Driving in the Same Direction

This is how I teach a dog to continue driving the stock in the same direction when I get out of sight or go out to bring in more stock.  You will need to adjust some as each dog is different, but the principle will be the same with any dog.

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Stockmanship

Stress is an important component of livestock health problems and effectively limits performance. Sources of stress include shipping, weaning, acclimation to new surroundings, processing, pen riding, treating, and sorting. People can be trained in stockmanship and management techniques that eliminate stress during these procedures and, in fact, make handling episodes

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From Zimbabwe

Here is an excerpt from a letter I received from Zimbabwe, Africa. “…..Cows calving at a good pace, but my ‘friends,’ the leopard and cheetah are still trying and in some cases causing havoc with the new born calves. Still pursuing with your principals of handling cattle with the emphasis

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Turning the Herd

People who are familiar with my method of working livestock know my number one aim is to work my animals with the least amount of stress possible. In fact, I have found ways to work livestock that actually takes existing stress off of them. It is just a bonus to

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How Long?

Yes, Allan, you are correct in saying the herder should be able to just go to the herd once a day, start them grazing in the desired direction or move them to a new area and settle them there and then leave. But, probably anyone who is vitally interested in

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Enough "Push"

I just got a phone call from one of your subscribers. A fellow I worked with a couple of years ago. He asked me if I could help him locate a dog with enough force to move cows. He has tried out several dogs lately, which handle yearlings fine, but

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