Bud Tee-Shirt

Posted July 6th, 2018 — Filed in Miscellaneous, Stockmanship

An email from Steve Cote—I was going through some boxes this week and came across a forgotten old T shirt from 1996 or 7. It has never been worn because it was a special one because of the story behind it.

When I was working with the Morgan Creek Grazing Association in Challis, ID, we had gone to schools and one day I was riding on the allotment with Lloyd Bradshaw and Tim Westfall. We were looking out over cattle scattered over thousands of acres. While we knew we had to get them working, we knew we had to get them put together and handling well like he said but in reality, none of knew just where to start. After we talked about it enough Lloyd finally said, “Let’s put a little Bud on em” and off we rode.

After that whenever were rode to new bunches, that was the game plan “put a little Bud on ‘em”. Things went phenomenally well that year, we won many awards, and the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District decided to get everyone involved in the project a Bud Williams T shirt. They took a picture of us moving stock on the allotment with a logo across it. The printer got the saying partly wrong but the idea was right.

Time to Write the Book!

Posted July 3rd, 2018 — Filed in Miscellaneous

[Note from Tina] Mom, Richard, and I have been talking about writing the book about Mom and Dad’s life for a long time now. Finally, we realized that, if we don’t start on it and really put some focus into it, it just won’t happen. Therefore, we have decided to not teach ANY Hand ‘n Hand Livestock Solutions schools in 2019 (except the 3 day Marketing and Stockmanship School in February just before the 2019 Bud Summit) so we can focus on collecting the information and writing the book.

So, if you have been putting off attending a school thinking, “I’ll just get the next one,” you might consider attending one of these four schools, or you will need to wait until 2020.

Here is the information about our remaining schools:

Watch for notice that the book is ready to order!

The Bud & Eunice Williams Book

We Do Not Endorse the BudFlow Tub System

Posted May 27th, 2018 — Filed in Miscellaneous, Stockmanship

I know Bud’s name means something in livestock circles so just to set the record straight, Bud Williams Stockmanship does NOT endorse the BudFlow tub system.

Canadian Job Opportunity

Posted March 1st, 2018 — Filed in Miscellaneous, Stockmanship

Hello Eunice, I haven’t talked with you in quite awhile.  My name is Kevin Cherpin.  I have worked at learning proper stockmanship for years.  I was introduced to it in college, and took the course from Richard and Tina about 3 winters ago.  I work on a community pasture in south west Saskatchewan.  It has been difficult to find riders for our summer riding positions, let alone one that wants to work toward proper stockmanship.  I was curious if you, Richard, or Tina would know of anyone that would be interested in a job like that in Canada?  This will be a federal position for this upcoming summer so they would need to be a Canadian resident. They wouldn’t need a lot of experience as long as they were keen and willing.  Thank you for your time.

Kevin Cherpin – SW Saskatchewan
1-306-296-7706    kevincherpin@gmail.com

New Farm Journal Wildfire Fund Will Double Your Donation

Posted April 24th, 2017 — Filed in Miscellaneous

Please join me in sending a donation for the ranchers who were impacted by the devastating wildfires last March.

Click on the link below to find out more about the New Farm Journal Fund which will double your donation.

http://www.agprofessional.com/news/industry/new-farm-journal-fund-doubles-your-donation-wildfire-recovery?

Eunice

Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Colorado Fire Relief

Posted March 20th, 2017 — Filed in Miscellaneous

Most of you reading this have heard (or experienced) the massive fires earlier this month. Several people have asked about ways they might contribute. Here are just a few links that you can use.

100 Year Old Sourdough – Q & A

Posted January 13th, 2017 — Filed in Miscellaneous

So far I’ve sent over 50 sourdough starters to people who have asked for them, many who haven’t had any experience baking with yeast or sourdough.  I encourage anyone to write if they have questions.  Since most of the questions are probably of interest to others I decided to post them here.
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Q… Thank you very much for the starter, I received it yesterday.  I followed your directions and got things started right away.  Like I said, I am a novice at this at best.  I haven’t seen a whole lot of bubbling but will check it tonight after work and see how it is going.  I am wondering about a lot of things but was wondering if I have more questions, can I ask you?
When you say covered – do you mean with a cloth or a lid loosely on a jar?  You said you drilled a small hole in a plastic lid – very small or relatively small, to release gasses?  When you feed the sourdough – do you do approximately what you had us start with – or a smaller amount?  I currently have it starting in a quart jar and I see you use a pint.

A… First off, RELAX ,   this starter has been around for 100 years and isn’t likely to die unless you poison it (with soda, baking powder or self-rising flour), or get it too hot.
Look at the sourdough through the side of your glass jar.  If you see tiny bubbles in the dough, things are going well.  I’ve kept a plastic bag, just like the one I mailed to you on my counter for the past two weeks, just to see how it would do.  Yesterday I put a spoonful of this into fresh flour and water and it bubbled up wonderfully.
Yes, cover with a cloth or loose lid to keep it clean.  It doesn’t take a very large hole to let gasses escape
I try to keep about 1/2 cup for starter.  When you feed it, discard all but about 1/4 cup and replace with enough flour and water to make 1/2 cup.
I suggest you put the discarded starter in a little bowl.  Add a pinch of salt, a little sugar, and a dab of butter.  Stir in enough flour until you can handle it.  Knead it for a few minutes and place it in an oven-safe cereal bowl (or a tuna can or. . .).  Cover and let it raise for two or three hours and bake it.  You have now made a little loaf of bread!  This is a good way towards building your confidence and learning how long, under your conditions, you need to let your bread raise.
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Q… I usually try to avoid wheat flour since I am gluten intolerant, but do you know if gluten-free flour, like Buckwheat, Quinoa, Sorghum, or Coconut would work for the feedings?

A… They should work OK.  You might keep a little starter going with regular flour then experiment with the others.  Let me know how it works out.
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Q…I have made one batch of biscuits.  They really weren’t too bad!  I am wondering about how much they raised or rather didn’t raise.  I started them as per the recipe in a big crock bowl which I set on the back of our wood pellet stove top.  It is just barely warm there.  At first the dough grew fast and then didn’t change for the next 4-5 hours.  I finally just added the other ingredients and put them on a cookie sheet on top of my cook stove with the oven turned to 200 degrees.  They didn’t double in size but did get bigger.  When baking they did grow some more.  They had very nice texture and we thought it was a fairly strong sourdough taste.  Should I have kept the dough warmer to start with?

A…No, I don’t think you needed to keep them warmer, maybe just let them raise a little longer before baking.  I’ve had problems sometimes putting them in a “warm” spot, not realizing it was too warm.
Sourdough bread will not be as light as yeast bread.  You will get the most “growth” immediately after feeding or adding the final ingredients for your recipe.  Unlike yeast bread don’t “punch it down” halfway through the raise period.  As soon as you add the final ingredients, make up the loaf or cinnamon rolls or  . . . , let raise then bake.

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Comment from Canada…I’m happy to report that your starter arrived tired and cold about a week ago.  It came to life quickly with a bit of TLC and I made this bread a couple of days ago.  I was interested to see if the taste of the bread was different from that made from the starter I have.  The answer is yes, a little.  The biggest difference I discovered happened overnight.  I made a couple of batches of bread (two loaves with your starter and two loaves with mine) before I went to bed last night.  When I am not going to be around to put it in the oven, (or if its to late) I just leave the bread pans covered in the garage (which is heated but cool) and let it sit overnight.  By morning is usually has risen a little, and I bring them back in the kitchen to finish rising and then bake.  This morning when I went out to retrieve the bread my loaves were within about an inch of the top of the pan and your loaves were just starting to hang over the edge!  So, your starter is pretty lively!  I had to flatten it out again and let it rise and they are in the oven now — looking pretty tasty.          So thank you Eunice.  I’m having fun with this.
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Comment from Texas…The bread is wonderful. It has a very rich sourdough taste and a great texture. The whole family loves it. I gave my sister-in-law a start from it this weekend. I’ll do my best to keep the starter going and share it around.

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Comment from Oregon…I just wanted to let you know the starter arrived in great shape and I fed it and cooked up a big batch of Pancakes with it yesterday for supper. Everyone loved them and our youngest son (23 YO) took 3 pancakes to work the next day for lunch because he liked them so much. I just wanted to thank you for your generosity.
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Another Comment from Texas… Thanks so much for the starter.  We had to be out of town so oldest daughter got first use.  Her family loved the pancakes she made.  Tonight I get fresh bread.  Thanks for your efforts.
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Comment from Minnesota…Thank you very much for the sour dough.  WOW, we really enjoyed the pancakes from your sourdough.  We used spealt instead of wheat flour and had blueberry and banana in them but they were the best I have ever had.  I also greatly enjoy the French bread and corn bread recipe’s.   Thank you so much.
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100 Year Old Sourdough

Posted January 3rd, 2017 — Filed in Miscellaneous

I’ve been a sourdough cook for over 60 years.  In 1961, L. R. Douglas DVM gave me an especially flavorful starter that his mother brought to California from South Dakota in 1917.  Dr. Doug was one of the first people who encouraged Bud to teach his livestock handling methods to others.

This starter has been to the Aleutian Islands and above the Arctic Circle in Alaska with me as well as to Oregon, Texas, Missouri, Kentucky, Nebraska, Kansas and Alberta, Canada. It has set on my counter in a lovely ceramic jug, and it has spent many nights in a plastic bag sharing a sleeping bag with Bud and me.

Since sourdough is just a collection of wild yeasts and bacteria that feed on carbohydrates, it is common practice to add a little sugar to the starter.  As Bud and I got older, my sourdough spent more time in the refrigerator and less time at room temperature where it could “work.”  Consequently, when I needed it to wake up and raise the biscuits, it was necessary to keep it at room temperature and feed it for several days in advance.

About this time we started reading about Kit Pharo and his philosophy of developing cattle that will produce on your place with little or no inputs.  I decided to put to put his concept to work with my sourdough.  No more sugar!  It has to get along on just flour and water.  Now, as soon as it warms up to room temperature it is ready to GO.  When you mix your final product which will have a little sugar and other things that these little bugs really like in it, it out produces any sourdough I have ever seen.

In celebration of its Centennial Year, I’ll be glad to share this starter with anyone who is interested.  Just send your mailing address along with $3.00 for postage.

Eunice

Wanted to Lease

Posted February 11th, 2016 — Filed in Miscellaneous

A Christian family committed to sustainable farming/grazing practices is looking for 80-plus acres with a farmhouse in Southwest Missouri.

Long term lease desired.
Willing to make improvements.
Grazeable acreage and access to water important.

Will Hedquist
417-5443-5223 or 417-924-2246

Changes to Subscription Website Access

Posted September 29th, 2015 — Filed in Subscription Site Information

If you are a website subscriber, you might have noticed that the stockmanship.com/subscription website access has changed due to hackers trying to break into our site.

In order to secure the site, you will need an additional username/password to access the site. I emailed everyone the new access information, however, if your email bounces or gets lost in spam-land and you didn’t get it, just email me at eunice@stockmanship.com, and I’ll explain the new access information.

Sorry for this inconvenience, but I guess these things just happen in today’s world of hackers trying to get their hands on anything of value!

— Eunice

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